W.J. McCallion Planetarium
 
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Banner and navigation constellation images from the open source planetarium software, Stellarium:

http://www.stellarium.org/
 

Current Schedule

Reserve your tickets and manage your reservations here. Tickets may be available at the door, but this is not guaranteed. If a show is sold out you can choose to be added to the waiting list, and you will be notified if seats become available. Please note that if you are late, your reserved tickets may be given away to those without reservations.

Date Show Description
January 22, 2020
Our Research Series: Rust and Stardust
Here at the McCallion planetarium, all of our presenters are graduate students doing fascinating astronomical research. In this series we highlight this with shows specifically built around the research of one of our presenters.

Have you ever looked up at the starry sky and felt small and insignificant compared to the vastness of the cosmos? What you will learn in this show is that you are actually made of the exact same material as these sparky dots up there. Stars produce the elements that compose everything you see - yourselves included - while they are born, live and die in the cosmic ocean. Visit the McCallion Planetarium this year and find out that you are literally made of stardust!
Show Times: 7:00pm, 8:15pm
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January 29, 2020
Discovering the Planets of our Solar System
When you look at the night sky, you see many bright spots. Nowadays, we know some of them are planets like our earth while most of others are stars like our sun. But how do we find out that in the first place? In this show, I will journey through the history of the planet discovery in our solar system. How do we know they are orbiting around our sun? How do we determine how far they are away from us? How do we push our limits to find planets we can’t see by eye? Is there a 9th planet yet to be discovered? We will answer all these questions and more!
Show Times: 7:00pm, 8:15pm
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February 5, 2020
Introductory Astronomy for Kids - Galaxies
Join us at the planetarium for a show especially geared towards a younger audience (around 8-15years old) and their family members. You've seen the Sun and the Moon, the planets, and the Hamilton night sky, but what's beyond the Solar System? In this show, we'll journey through the Milky Way and discuss our Solar System's place in the Galaxy and our Galaxy's place in the Universe. How long will it take to get to the nearest star and visit other worlds? What's in the center of our Galaxy? How does our Galaxy compare to others? We'll answer all these questions and more!
Show Times: 5:45pm, 7:00pm
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February 12, 2020
Behind the Lens: Women's Contributions in Astronomy
Often times in the history of science, women's contributions can go unnoticed or underappreciated, so taking time to shine a spotlight on what we have learned about our universe thanks to some incredible women can give us a more complete understanding of who is behind the telescope. Join us in meeting astronomers such as Vera Rubin, Henrietta Swan Leavitt, Jocelyn Bell Burnell, among many others, explore the history of astronomy, and learn about our universe through each of their discoveries.
Show Times: 7:00pm, 8:15pm
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February 19, 2020
Moons
Did you know that there are hundreds of moons in our Solar System? Six of the eight planets are collectively home to most of these, and even some dwarf planets have their own moons! In this show we will voyage from planet to planet and visit some of the most interesting moons that our Solar System has to offer. We'll explore the weird orbit of Triton, the geysers of Enceladus, the volcanoes of Io, and many other interesting satellites!
Show Times: 7:00pm, 8:15pm
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February 26, 2020
Galaxies: Island Universes
Galaxies, by definition, are massive, gravitationally bound systems that consist of stars, stellar remnants, and a mixture of gas, dust, and dark matter. There are more than 170 billion galaxies in the observable universe. Most are 1,000 to 100,000 parsecs (30.9 trillion kilometers) in diameter. The size of galaxies range anywhere from 10 million stars in the smaller end of the spectrum to 100 million stars at the larger end. It is believed that many, if not all, galaxies are centralized with super massive black holes. Galaxies are generally categorized based on their visual appearance. Learn about the different types while journeying across the universe and observing what galaxies look like! The concept of dark matter will be discussed and how it relates to the rotation of galaxies.
Show Times: 7:00pm, 8:15pm
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March 4, 2020
Introductory Astrononomy for Kids - Solar System
Join us at the planetarium for a show especially geared towards a younger audience (around 8-15years old) and their family members. We'll first take you on a tour around the night skies seen from Hamilton, and then focus on the many fascinating bodies within our Solar System. Along the way we will visit all of the Planets, some of the most interesting moons, and even more if time permits!
Show Times: 5:45pm, 7:00pm
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March 11, 2020
Celestial Shadows
From the phases of the Moon, to the transit of Venus, to the total eclipse of the Sun: celestial shadows have fascinated humans repeatedly throughout history. But what is it about the orbits of celestial bodies that presents us with such captivating phenomena? Come and discover the science behind the rare and exceptional alignments in the Solar System that give observers on Earth a sight worth seeing!
Show Times: 7:00pm, 8:15pm
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March 18, 2020
Across the Universe
The night sky provides countless metaphors for the impossible, the inescapable and the infinite. From Frank Sinatra’s Fly Me to the Moon to Muse’s Neutron Star Collision, music has long relied on astronomical objects to effortlessly describe different facets of love and life. But what are these objects, and where can we find them ? Join us for an evening of exploration, to the sound of songs from all Across the Universe.
Show Times: 7:00pm, 8:15pm
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March 25, 2020
Backyard Astronomy
Do you want to learn more about the night sky and astronomical objects, but you don’t know where to start? At the planetarium we have a special show all about the basics of stargazing from finding your way around the sky using constellations, navigating by the stars, identifying planets and even a few exotic deep sky objects that can be seen with the naked eye or a decent pair of binoculars. This show is perfect for anybody who wants to learn more about the sights above their own backyard.
Show Times: 7:00pm, 8:15pm
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April 1, 2020
Introductory Astronomy for Kids - Galaxies
Join us at the planetarium for a show especially geared towards a younger audience (around 8-15years old) and their family members. You've seen the Sun and the Moon, the planets, and the Hamilton night sky, but what's beyond the Solar System? In this show, we'll journey through the Milky Way and discuss our Solar System's place in the Galaxy and our Galaxy's place in the Universe. How long will it take to get to the nearest star and visit other worlds? What's in the center of our Galaxy? How does our Galaxy compare to others? We'll answer all these questions and more!
Show Times: 5:45pm, 7:00pm
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April 8, 2020
Common Misconceptions in Astronomy
Have you ever wondered if what you saw in the latest science fiction movie was actually factual? How much of that news headline you saw was accurate? In this show we explore some of the misinformation and exaggerations we hear about astronomy. We separate fact from fiction and get an idea of where common misinformation in science communication stems from. Buckle in for some myth-busting under the dome!
Show Times: 7:00pm, 8:15pm
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April 15, 2020
The Celestial Bear: The Six Nations' Night Sky
"That is how I heard the story, so I thought that is how you would hear it as well..." Join us for a fascinating show that blends local culture, history and modern-day astronomy that shares the Six Nations' sky lore and language through traditional indigenous night-sky stories. With narration and visuals by a live presentation and pre-recorded excerpts (in English, Mohawk and Cayuga), learn about the story of the bear and the brothers and how it is retold every year with the rotating patterns in the night sky. See the same stars with a completely different understanding and appreciation!his show was collaboratively-produced by members of the Six Nations, McMaster's Indigenous Studies Program, and the McCallion Planetarium.
Show Times: 7:00pm, 8:15pm
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April 22, 2020
Our Research Series: How to Kill a Galaxy
Here at the McCallion planetarium, all of our presenters are graduate students doing fascinating astronomical research. In this series we highlight this with shows specifically built around the research of one of our presenters.

Galaxies are star factories, however not all galaxies are alike. Beautiful blue, spiral galaxies are forming new stars vigorously, whereas red, elliptical galaxies are seemingly broken, not able to form any new stars. This has lead to elliptical galaxies being referred to as "Red and Dead". "How do galaxies form new stars?" and "What causes a galaxy to stop forming stars?" These are questions that have puzzled astronomers for decades. In this show we will learn about how galaxies work, what the "recipe" is for making a new star, and what may cause a galaxy to stop making new stars, becoming "Red and Dead". Join us at the McCallion Planetarium as we venture all the way from our own Milky Way Galaxy deep into the depths of huge galaxy clusters in order to solve this murder mystery.
Show Times: 7:00pm, 8:15pm
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April 29, 2020
Scales of the Universe
Starting from a look at the hunk of rock that's orbiting planet Earth, we work our way through the components of our Universe in this show. From planets to black holes, this show highlights our tiny place in the vast cosmos, while setting a foundation for the casual observer to look up at the night sky. We work our way up to the structure of the cosmic web where we look at a modern day simulation of our Universe, starting shortly after the Big Bang all the way to present day.
Show Times: 7:00pm, 8:15pm
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