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Faculty of Science

Department of Physics & Astronomy

Wytse van Dijk
Wytse van Dijk

Contact Info

Wytse
van Dijk
Adjunct Professor
ABB 274
26146
905-546-1252
...

Summary

Wytse van Dijk completed his undergraduate and graduate studies at McMaster University, receiving in 1968 the Ph.D in nuclear theory. He spent two years as a postdoctoral fellow at the Theoretical Physics Department of the University of Oxford, England. After a one-year faculty appointment at Mount Allison University, New Brunswick, he joined the faculty of Dordt College, Sioux Center, Iowa. During the 1977-78 academic year he was on leave at the Theoretical Physics Institute of the University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta. In 1982 he was appointed Professor of Mathematics and Physics at Redeemer University College, Ancaster, Ontario and Adjunct Professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at McMaster University; both positions he holds at the present.

Dr. van Dijk's earlier research focused on the nuclear force problem and its application to low-energy nuclear systems. This research was motivated by the desire to understand the effect of quark or elementary-particle degrees of freedom in nuclear structure or scattering. The most recent work has dealt with sensitivity of the mixing parameter associated with the 3S1 - 3D1 coupling in the nuclear force to the one-pion exchange.

Recently van Dijk has become interested in decaying quantum systems which simulate the nuclear alpha decay. In particular the theoretical determination of the ionization and bremsstrahlung probabilities due to an alpha particle being emitted from its nucleus is found to shed light on fundamental issues in quantum mechanics as well as mechanisms responsible for nuclear structure. The Bohm trajectory method is also being studied in connection with decaying and scattering systems.

Dr. van Dijk is also interested in theoretical and numerical analyses of quantum mechanical scattering phenomena such as time delay and advance in (un)coupled one-dimensional systems. Aspects of this study have been applied to semiconductor superlattices and quantum computing. This is part of a program of studying time-dependent quantum mechanical systems.

Numerical solutions of quantum wave equations, time-dependent phenomena, quantum search algorithms, statistical mechanics of ultracold gases

Media

Wytse van Dijk completed his undergraduate and graduate studies at McMaster University, receiving in 1968 the Ph.D in nuclear theory. He spent two years as a postdoctoral fellow at the Theoretical Physics Department of the University of Oxford, England. After a one-year faculty appointment at Mount Allison University, New Brunswick, he joined the faculty of Dordt College, Sioux Center, Iowa. During the 1977-78 academic year he was on leave at the Theoretical Physics Institute of the University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta. In 1982 he was appointed Professor of Mathematics and Physics at Redeemer University College, Ancaster, Ontario and Adjunct Professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at McMaster University; both positions he holds at the present.

Dr. van Dijk's earlier research focused on the nuclear force problem and its application to low-energy nuclear systems. This research was motivated by the desire to understand the effect of quark or elementary-particle degrees of freedom in nuclear structure or scattering. The most recent work has dealt with sensitivity of the mixing parameter associated with the 3S1 - 3D1 coupling in the nuclear force to the one-pion exchange.

Recently van Dijk has become interested in decaying quantum systems which simulate the nuclear alpha decay. In particular the theoretical determination of the ionization and bremsstrahlung probabilities due to an alpha particle being emitted from its nucleus is found to shed light on fundamental issues in quantum mechanics as well as mechanisms responsible for nuclear structure. The Bohm trajectory method is also being studied in connection with decaying and scattering systems.

Dr. van Dijk is also interested in theoretical and numerical analyses of quantum mechanical scattering phenomena such as time delay and advance in (un)coupled one-dimensional systems. Aspects of this study have been applied to semiconductor superlattices and quantum computing. This is part of a program of studying time-dependent quantum mechanical systems.

McMaster University - Faculty of Science

Mailing Address

Department of Physics & Astronomy,
McMaster University

ABB-241
1280 Main Street West
Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
L8S 4M1

Contact Information

Telephone Inquiries:
+1 (905) 525-9140 ext.24559
Fax:
(905) 546-1252
Email Inquiries:
physics@mcmaster.ca

McMaster University - Faculty of Science

Mailing Address

Department of Physics & Astronomy,
McMaster University

ABB-241
1280 Main Street West
Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
L8S 4M1

Contact Information

Telephone Inquiries:
+1 (905) 525-9140 ext.24558
Fax:
(905) 546-1252
Email Inquiries:
physics@mcmaster.ca